Posts Tagged ‘Phil Spector’

BRENDA & THE TABULATIONS – DRY YOUR EYES // THE DIXIE CUPS – CHAPEL OF LOVE // Ben E. King – Spanish Harlem

July 21, 2016

 

Brenda and the tabulations dry your eyes.png

BRENDA & THE TABULATIONS – DRY YOUR EYES (1967)

I absolutely adore this record. It’s been a go-to of mine for a little while now (I know I’ve mentioned it before on here but I can’t find the post). Brenda & The Tabulations were a group out of Philadelphia in 1966. Brenda Payton has a one of a kind voice in my opinion, and definitely stands out in the girl-group era (note she was the only girl in the band until ’71 when they brought in two female back-up harmony singers). I really love her voice and this whole record is amazing.

Iko Iko came on the other day and..

The_Dixie_Cups_-_Chapel_of_Love.jpg

THE DIXIE CUPS – CHAPEL OF LOVE (1964)

The Dixie Cups were probably best known for the title track off this record Chapel of Love and Iko Iko, however it’s the rest of the record that I enjoy most, particularly I’m Gonna Get You Yet. I love the minimal percussion and female vox. This record was the debut studio album of the New Orleans group, produced by Jerry Lieber, Mike Stoller, Jeff Barry & Ellie Greewich. (Jerry Lieber and Mike Stoller produced  hits like “Stand by Me” by Ben E. King.)

Speaking of Ben E. King…

Ben+E+King+Spanish+Harlem+452224.jpg

Ben E. King – Spanish Harlem (1960)

Spanish Harlem has been on repeat for me as of late, it was also produced by Jerry Lieber with Phil Spector. One of the most beautiful songs to listen to, specifically walking around New York City on a summer day.

Songs of Love And Hate, Death of A Ladies Man, The Wall of Sound

June 19, 2010


Songs of Love and Hate (1971) is probably my second favorite Leonard Cohen album after his debut The Songs of Leonard Cohen (1967); although to be honest, they’re nearly tied.

Track 1 from Songs of Love And Hate, ‘Avalanche’, is incredible.. perfect, creepy, and notoriously hard to play (which seems, er- sounds true enough).

Avalanche
https://zdanz.files.wordpress.com/2010/06/01-avalanche.mp3″

Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds did a cover of ‘Avalanche’ on their 1984 debut album From Her to Eternity.

An interesting record is Cohen’s Death of a Ladies’ Man, which Phil Spector produced using mainly his Wall of Sound* technique (very different than previous Leonard Cohen recordings).

Which brings me to the:

*Wall of Sound: music production technique for pop and rock music recordings developed by record producer Phil Spector at Gold Star Studios during the 1960s (a dense, layered, and reverberant sound that reproduced well on AM radio and jukeboxes popular in the era).

He created this sound by having a number of electric and acoustic guitarists perform the same parts in unison, adding musical arrangements for large groups of musicians up to the size of orchestras, and then recording the sound using an echo chamber. [1]

Ex: From Leonard’s Death Of A Ladies’ Man:

Memories
https://zdanz.files.wordpress.com/2010/06/04-memories.mp3″

Pretty easy to hear it, right?

Some more notable examples: Spector produced The Beatles’ Let it Be. (You can hear the difference in the the later, remastered Let it Be… Naked produced by McCartney, and therefore without Spector’s ‘Wall of Sound’). Brian Wilson used a similar technique on Smile & Pet Sounds, etc.

The obvious usage is found in many of Spector’s girl group songs..

And Then He Kissed Me [The Crystals]
https://zdanz.files.wordpress.com/2010/06/15-then-he-kissed-me.mp3″

Also:

Currently, the wall of sound pretty heavily influences shoegaze and the like (a good example is My Bloody Valentine’s 1991 album Loveless).

I should point out – this ‘wall of sound’ is completely separate from the Greatful Dead’s version of the term.

Well, goodnight- and speaking of Phil Spector, is this not the greatest picture ever?